Health Equity Organizational Assessment (HEOA) Resources

These resources supplement the HEOA and can help organizations committed to collecting, validating, stratifying and analyzing accurate patient demographic data identify and address health disparities.

HEOA Executive Summary: This resource, targeted to executive leaders in healthcare organizations, outlines the benefits of completing the HEOA from a C-Suite perspective.

Health Equity Roadmap: This roadmap is a step-by-step guide for implementing the key elements of health equity for organizations committed to a culture of equity.

Best Practices Strategies for Health Equity Data Collection: This resource outlines strategies and corresponding tasks and resources for each of the seven HEOA categories to assist organizations to address opportunities for improvement based on their HEOA assessment report.

HEOA Assessment FAQs: This resource has frequently asked questions and responses about the Health Equity Organizational Assessment (HEOA).

REaL Data Collection Toolbox: This Learning Toolbox focuses on healthcare facilities collecting data on race, ethnicity, and language preference (REaL) as an important component of the provision of equity in the healthcare setting. It includes a quick primer on data collection, and provides links to articles, tools, and resources to educate providers on the importance of knowing the diverse patient population for which they provide care.

Collecting REaL Data – Examples of How to Ask for REaL Data: This Resource Guide provides examples on how best to collect race, ethnicity, and language (REaL) data and ensure that it is being collected consistently and accurately.

REaL Data Collection Toolbox

This Learning Toolbox focuses on healthcare facilities collecting data on race,
ethnicity, and language preference (REaL) as an important component of the
provision of equity in the healthcare setting.

It includes a quick primer on data collection, and provides links to articles, tools, and resources to educate providers on the importance of knowing the diverse patient population for which they provide care.

Joy in Work

Executive Summary
With increasing demands on time, resources, and energy, in addition to poorly designed systems of daily work, it’s not surprising health care professionals are experiencing burnout at increasingly higher rates, with staff turnover rates also on the rise. Yet, joy in work is more than just the absence of burnout or an issue of individual wellness; it is a system property. It is generated (or not) by the system and occurs (or not) organization-wide. Joy in work — or lack thereof — not only impacts individual staff engagement and satisfaction, but also patient experience, quality of care, patient safety, and organizational performance.

This white paper, published by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), is intended to serve as a guide for health care organizations to engage in a participative process where leaders ask colleagues at all levels of the organization, “What matters to you?” — enabling them to better understand the barriers to joy in work, and co-create
meaningful, high-leverage strategies to address these issues.
The white paper describes the following:
* The importance of joy in work (the “why”);
* Four steps leaders can take to improve joy in work (the “how”);
* The IHI Framework for Improving Joy in Work: nine critical components of a system for ensuring a joyful, engaged workforce (the “what”);
* Key change ideas for improving joy in work, along with examples from organizations that helped test them; and
* Measurement and assessment tools for gauging efforts to improve joy in work.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Use When Caring for Patients with Confirmed or Suspected COVID-19 Competency

This tool is designed to support nurses, social workers, case managers, and others conducting effective discharge planning and care coordination for adults with disabilities who received care or treatment for COVID-19 illness in an acute care setting, are no longer COVID-19 positive, and require continuation or reconnection to supports and services. While not exhaustive, the resources and considerations proposed in this tool comprise promising practices to be addressed when practicable.